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February 19, 2024 | Tank Garage Winery

Behind the Scenes Of Camera Shy

Camera Shy

There's an undeniable thrill in defying expectations, in breaking free from the mold and painting your own masterpiece. This sentiment is the very essence of our latest release, Camera Shy, a bold and rebellious red that bursts with flavor and challenges convention. But the story doesn't end with the wine itself. To truly capture the essence of Camera Shy, we turned to the enigmatic street artist, Ruse BAD, whose vibrant and empowering works resonate perfectly with the wine's spirit.

Ruse BAD's art transcends mere aesthetics. It's a celebration of female strength and individuality, a vibrant tapestry woven with bright colors, striking figures, and empowering messages. Just like Camera Shy's complex blend of flavors, Ruse BAD's artwork layers meaning upon meaning, inviting viewers to delve deeper and discover their own inner "Bad Beauty." Her roots run deep in the Bay Area, and she is now currently working and living in the Northeast. 

Ruse Bad painting a wall

How would you describe your art style?

My art style borders on surreal I suppose, with hints of graffiti art embedded within it; with the bold colors and exaggerated eyelashes, I aim to transport the viewer into my world: Bright colors with neon hues as warm as the sun, surrounding a uniquely beautiful woman that radiates her inner strength into the world,  to be viewed by all who are near her.  Powerful words and phrases surround her, like guardian angels reminding her of the countless qualities that she possesses within her.


Ultimately, I love for my work to be viewed as a source of empowerment for all that interact with it. If I can get one person to feel better about THEMSELVES,  then I've done my job.

A Ruse Bad Original

What inspires you?

My layouts and color schemes are inspired by artists from the past, as well as the 1980s.  I use alot of bright colors, neon and pastel hues.
However, the inspiration for the main portion of my work is inspired by women of all types everyday; The celebrity on the news that just spilled her heart out in her memoir;  the young girl at school that's being bullied for looking a little different; the trans woman paving a way to her truth; the single mother that doesn't love herself like she should....the list goes on! There's beauty and strength all around you. Sometimes it takes a little, or a lot, of soul searching.

What does your process look like?

Backgrounds are one of the most important parts of my artwork,  and usually take the most time creating. The background is a painting of the beauty within the subject of the piece. 


Each one is unique and one of a kind; no 2 pieces are exactly alike (just like real women. )  Each color has its exact place on the canvas.  Once I've completed background colors and blends, I then incorporate visual empowerment (words and phrases) into the piece; again, the layout and positioning is calculated and thought out.  Once I feel like I've created the inner beauty,  I then create the woman that embodies the vision I had at the beginning. 


Eyes are the windows to the soul; however, one must be careful when bearing their soul to others. So the eyelashes, sharp and long, and like knives. A protector of sorts, of the essence within. In some of my pieces, the woman is holding a gun. The gun is not an actual handgun, but it's the POWER the woman holds; her STRENGTH,  her ABILITIES.  Every woman carries a gun. 

Camera Shy

What's the concept behind Camera Shy?

Having my artistic roots in graffiti, there's a level of secrecy and elusivness that goes with the territory.  Finding the balance between being a known artist, and remaining anonymous is a battle.  I have my BAD BEAUTIES front and center; collected around the world, when you see my females, you know it's my creation. But my "Ruse Ghost" is always in the background; a reminder, a memory, of where I've been and where a part of me will always remain; hiding in the shadows, always making my mark.

What is your dream?

So many dreams, so little time! Artistically, I'd love to have a solo exhibition in Europe. I'd also love to do a limited edition line of accessories or clothing.  I'd also like to create a line of home goods,  such as linens or drinkware. Personally, I'd love to have an animal sanctuary, where I could also educate people on the importance of a vegan lifestyle,  and how all lives are important.


I'd rescue farm animals of all kinds, and dogs.  I'd love to have a huge pasture full of rescued pugs, chihuahuas, frenchies and Boston terriers. I'd lay in the middle of the field and let them run and jump all over me. Ah, what a life.

 

Order Camera Shy

Time Posted: Feb 19, 2024 at 8:00 AM Permalink to Behind the Scenes Of Camera Shy Permalink
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February 18, 2024 | Tank Garage Winery

Hot Fuss X Dumplings

Hot Fuss at a counter in Chinatown

Lunar New Year is upon us, and it's time to ring in the Year of the Dragon with explosive flavor and unforgettable feasts!

This year, we’re cranking up the celebration with a match made in flavor heaven: the fiercely delicious Hot Fuss white wine and mouthwatering dumplings, a symbol of prosperity and good fortune!

We’ve included two delicious dumpling recipes to choose from: Pork and Cabbage Dumplings and a Kale, Egg and Mushroom Dumpling for our veggie lovers.

With its vibrant notes of citrus, pear, and a touch of spice, Hot Fuss is the perfect wine to complement the savory and satisfying flavors of dumplings. It's a flavor fusion so good, it deserves its own fireworks display!

A note from the chef – the recipes below can be easily made with store-bought dumpling/posticker wrappers, but making your own dough can be extreely satisfying (and even more delicious). Choose your own adventure!

Dumplings

Pork and Cabbage Dumplings

MAKES ABOUT 48 DUMPLINGS

Dumpling Dough (or use store-bought dumpling wrappers):

2 ½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour

¾ cup warm tap water

Filling:

1 pound ground pork, preferably Kurobuta pork (or other type that’s not too lean)

2 ½ cups, loosely packed, finely chopped Chinese cabbage

1 stalk green onions, finely chopped

1 teaspoon minced ginger

2 tablespoons soy sauce

¼ teaspoon ground white pepper, optional

1 teaspoon sesame oil

Instructions

The beginning of dumpling dough.

For the dough: Place the flour in a mixing bowl. Add the water and, using a rubber spatula  or wooden spoon, stir the water and flour together. Continue to stir gently until a ball of dough starts to form. Start kneading the dough to make a ball. The dough should feel slightly tacky but not damp. Cover the dough with a damp towel or plastic wrap and let it rest for a minimum of 20 minutes.

For the filling: Combine all the filling ingredients in a bowl and mix well.

Making dumpling wrappers

To make the wrappers: Divide the dough in half. Roll each half into a rope that’s about ¾ inch in diameter and about 18 inches or so in length. Cut each rope into pieces that are about ¾ inch thick (or about 9 or 10 grams). Roll each piece into a ball, then press it between your palms into a silver-dollar-size disk. With a Chinese rolling pin (available in Asian markets) or a 3/4-inch wooden dowel from a hardware store, roll each disk into a flat circle about 3 inches in diameter. Don’t worry about making a perfect circle.

Filling the dumplings

Filling the dumplings: Place a dollop of filling, about a teaspoon or so, into the center of a wrapper. Fold the round wrapper in half over the center into a half-moon shape and pinch shut along the edges. The dough should be just sticky enough to seal without using water or egg. Repeat until you have used up all the dough or you run out of filling.

To cook the dumplings: Heat an 8- to 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium-low to medium-high heat (you may have to adjust the heat according to your stove). Add about 3 tablespoons vegetable oil and swirl it around to coat the bottom. Place as many dumplings in the skillet as will fit. Add 1/2 to 3/4 cup water to the pan, depending on the size of the pan. Cover immediately with a lid and do not remove or the steam will escape. Cook until bottoms are crisp and brown but not burned, about 7 to 9 minutes. The sizzling will subside as the water evaporates. Remove the potstickers and serve with Soy-Ginger Dipping Sauce.

Kale, Egg and Mushroom Dumplings

MAKES ABOUT 48 DUMPLINGS

Dumpling Dough (or use store-bought dumpling wrappers):

2 ½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour

¾ cup warm tap water

Filling:

2 Tablespoons vegetable oil, divided

2 large eggs, beaten

2 stalks green onions, finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

10 ounces spinach, roughly chopped (fresh is best but frozen is fine if well drained)

1 tablespoon water

1 cup grated garrots

6 edium dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked in warm water to reconstitute, finely diced (about a 1/2 cup)

2 tablespoons soy sauce

kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

Instructions

For the dough: Place the flour in a mixing bowl. Add the water and, using a rubber spatula  or wooden spoon, stir the water and flour together. Continue to stir gently until a ball of dough starts to form. Start kneading the dough to make a ball. The dough should feel slightly tacky but not damp. Cover the dough with a damp towel or plastic wrap and let it rest for a minimum of 20 minutes.

Dumpling filling cooking in a pan

For the filling: Preheat a wok over medium-high heat for about 1 minute. Add 1 tablespoon of the vegetable oil and heat for about 5 seconds, or until it starts to shimmer. Add the eggs, gently scramble them, and cook until the curds are medium hard. You don't want the eggs too soft or rubbery. Remove the wok from the heat, transfer the eggs to a medium bowl, and set aside. Rinse the wok and dry it completely.

Return the wok to the stove and preheat over high heat for 10 seconds. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil, and immediately add the onions and garglic. Stir vigorously for 30 seconds to allow the aromatics to release into the oil. Add the spinach and water, and stir and toss for about 30 seconds to cook down the greens. Add the ggs, carrot, and mushrooms and stir well to combine. Add the bean thread, stir, and reduce the heat to low. Add soy sauce and stir to combine. If you are not attentive, the bean thread may stick to the wok. Stir continueously and adjust the heat if necessary. Ad salt to taste, if needed. Add the sesame oil. Sitre once again, then remove the wok from the heat and transfer the filling to a medium heatproof bowl to help keep it cool. Set the filling aside.

To make the wrappers: Divide the dough in half. Roll each half into a rope that’s about ¾ inch in diameter and about 18 inches or so in length. Cut each rope into pieces that are about ¾ inch thick (or about 9 or 10 grams). Roll each piece into a ball, then press it between your palms into a silver-dollar-size disk. With a Chinese rolling pin (available in Asian markets) or a 3/4-inch wooden dowel from a hardware store, roll each disk into a flat circle about 3 inches in diameter. Don’t worry about making a perfect circle.

Dumplings

Filling the dumplings: Place a dollop of filling, about a teaspoon or so, into the center of a wrapper. Fold the round wrapper in half over the center into a half-moon shape and pinch shut along the edges. The dough should be just sticky enough to seal without using water or egg. Repeat until you have used up all the dough or you run out of filling.

To cook the dumplings: Heat an 8- to 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium-low to medium-high heat (you may have to adjust the heat according to your stove). Add about 3 tablespoons vegetable oil and swirl it around to coat the bottom. Place as many dumplings in the skillet as will fit. Add 1/2 to 3/4 cup water to the pan, depending on the size of the pan. Cover immediately with a lid and do not remove or the steam will escape. Cook until bottoms are crisp and brown but not burned, about 7 to 9 minutes. The sizzling will subside as the water evaporates. Remove the potstickers and serve with Soy-Ginger Dipping Sauce.

Soy-Ginger Dipping Sauce

MAKES ABOUT ½ CUP

⅓ cup soy sauce

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1 tablespoon chopped cilantro

1 stalk green onion, finely chopped

1-2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1 teaspoon peeled and minced fresh ginger

1 teaspoon chili sauce, optional

Instructions

To Make The Sauce: Mix all the ingredients in a small bowl. If you have time to let it sit for at least 30 minutes, the flavors will meld together. The longer the mixture rests, the more intense the flavor becomes. Once mixed, the sauce will keep in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Recipes sourced from Chinese Soul Food: A Friendly Guide for Homemade Dumplings, Stir-Fries, Soups, and More by Hsiao-Ching Chou

Time Posted: Feb 18, 2024 at 8:00 AM Permalink to Hot Fuss X Dumplings Permalink
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